Tuesday, February 8, 2011

All Ambassadors Called Back to Washington!


In an unprecedented move, apparently one that has never happened before, nearly all U.S. Ambassadors to all nations have been called back to Washington for a summit conference. This event, mostly unreported, concluded on 4-Feb-2011.

politico.com reports, “Ambassadors from almost all 260 U.S. embassies, consulates and other posts in more than 180 countries are expected to convene at the State Department for what’s being billed as the first meeting of its kind.”

huffingtonpost.com, “Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is convening an unprecedented mass meeting of U.S. ambassadors.”


The first logical thought that comes to mind…
Looking back at all previous world crisis, what might now be so important, evidently more-so than anything ever in the past, to call all Ambassadors back to Washington? And why has the press not reported on such an unusual event involving every U.S. diplomatic ambassador in the world?

The sky’s the limit with ideas and conspiracy…


To get all their stories ‘straight’ ahead of time – for something

To prearrange settling the debt score between nations prior to a new world currency roll-out

A dollar currency devaluation

China is calling in our debt

New severely damaging Wikileaks about to release

Afraid of electronic communication leaks of something very important to discuss

???


While most Americans were involved with the SuperBowl, and the main stream media with the situation in Egypt, hardly any reporting on the event can be found… fine time to do something ‘under the radar’.

Could this actually be simply a ‘first time’ of such a gathering to discuss ‘normal’ business? At first instinct, suspicion is aroused.

stay tuned…


Update, found this link from the U.S. Department of State website ‘Notice to the Press’ on February 1. This meeting was ‘officially’ about something named QDDR.

http://www.state.gov/s/dmr/qddr/

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2011/02/155834.htm

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton convened the first ever Global Chiefs of Mission Conference. This will be the first time U.S. Ambassadors will gather from around the world simultaneously. A principal aim of the conference will be to prepare for the implementation of the recommendations in the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR)

“The QDDR provides a blueprint for elevating American “civilian power” to better advance our national interests and to be a better partner to the U.S. military.”

Some of the objectives of the QDDR

* Creating an Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy and the Environment
* Establishing a new Bureau for Energy Resources
* Creating an Under Secretary for Civilian Security
* Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security Affairs
* Establish a Bureau for Counterterrorism
* Establishing a Coordinator for Cyber Issues



In summary, it appears that the U.S. State Department is trying to establish more effective control over their foreign ambassador offices and programs. The QDDR is the only official explanation offered by the State Dept. as to the reason for calling in all foreign ambassadors. Who knows what else goes on behind closed door meetings…

Friday, February 4, 2011

HAARP Triangulation Measurement Sensor Stations, NLE 2011

Contributed By Buzzvessel

Who knows about HAARP having these Digisonde Triangulation Measurement Sensor Stations? One is in each: Gilbertsville, KY, Beebe, AR & LaBarre, LA....all three were mass killsites of birds recently. HAARP is aimed at the approximate locations of these Sensor Stations or receivers, then fine-tuned to insure the energy field is precisely on target. This triangulation of stations is placed at 120 degrees in an Isosceles Triangle. The epicenter is then in the center of the long line of the furthest points and is where the auroral ionospheric energy will be at maximum during HAARP transmission.

This focus point is in this key position of the sensor stations in the aforementioned towns in KY, AR & LA and happens to be on the New Madrid Fault Line! Ten major natural gas pipelines and underground nuclear facilities along that fault line would rupture and disrupt service to hundreds of thousands of people, as well as cause massive radiation to the area. Oak Ridge Laboratory in Tennessee has sealed off rooms of radioactive equipment that were meant to never be opened again.



The Global Seismic Hazard Map shows a straight line death zone of birds, fish, etc in Gakona, Alaska, Gilbertsville, KY, Beebe, AR¸ LaBarre, LA, Port Orange, FL, Rio de Jainero, Brazil, Valkoping, Sweden and the list is growing.



National Level Exercise 2011 (NLE 2011) is scheduled for May 2011 when FEMA will simulate the catastrophic nature of a major earthquake in the central United States region of the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The year 2011 is the bicentennial anniversary of the 1811 New Madrid earthquake, for which the NMSZ is named. NMSZ will be the first NLE to simulate a natural hazard.

Remember that TPTB have planned exercises mimicking catastrophes in the past. Two that come to mind were carried out on September 11, 2001 in New York and on July 7, 2005 in London.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Get Internet Access When Your Government Shuts It Down


Does your government have an Internet kill-switch? Read our guide to Guerrilla Networking and be prepared for when the lines get cut.

By Patrick Miller, David Daw, PCWorld

These days, no popular movement goes without an Internet presence of some kind, whether it’s organizing on Facebook or spreading the word through Twitter. And as we’ve seen in Egypt, that means that your Internet connection can be the first to go. Whether you’re trying to check in with your family, contact your friends, or simply spread the word, here are a few ways to build some basic network connectivity when you can’t rely on your cellular or landline Internet connections.

Do-It-Yourself Internet With Ad-Hoc Wi-Fi

Even if you’ve managed to find an Internet connection for yourself, it won’t be that helpful in reaching out to your fellow locals if they can’t get online to find you. If you’re trying to coordinate a group of people in your area and can’t rely on an Internet connection, cell phones, or SMS, your best bet could be a wireless mesh network of sorts–essentially, a distributed network of wireless networking devices that can all find each other and communicate with each other. Even if none of those devices have a working Internet connection, they can still find each other, which, if your network covers the city you’re in, might be all you need. At the moment, wireless mesh networking isn’t really anywhere close to market-ready, though we have seen an implementation of the 802.11s draft standard, which extends the 802.11 Wi-Fi standard to include wireless mesh networking, in the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) XO laptop.

However, a prepared guerrilla networker with a handful of PCs could make good use of Daihinia ($25, 30-day free trial), an app that piggybacks on your Wi-Fi adapter driver to turn your normal ad-hoc Wi-Fi network into a multihop ad-hoc network (disclaimer: we haven’t tried this ourselves yet), meaning that instead of requiring each device on the network to be within range of the original access point, you simply need to be within range of a device on the network that has Daihinia installed, effectively allowing you to add a wireless mesh layer to your ad-hoc network.

Advanced freedom fighters can set up a portal Web page on their network that explains the way the setup works, with Daihinia instructions and a local download link so they can spread the network even further. Lastly, just add a Bonjour-compatible chat client like Pidgin or iChat, and you’ll be able to talk to your neighbors across the city without needing an Internet connection.

Back to Basics

Remember when you stashed your old modems in the closet because you thought you might need them some day? In the event of a total communications blackout–as we’re seeing in Egypt, for example–you’ll be glad you did. Older and simpler tools, like dial-up Internet or even ham radio, could still work, since these “abandoned” tech avenues aren’t being policed nearly as hard.

In order to get around the total shutdown of all of the ISPs within Egypt, several international ISPs are offering dial-up access to the Internet to get protesters online, since phone service is still operational. It’s slow, but it still works–the hard part is getting the access numbers without an Internet connection to find them.

Unfortunately, such dial-up numbers can also be fairly easily shut down by the Egyptian government, so you could also try returning to FidoNet–a distributed networking system for BBSes that was popular in the 1980s. FidoNet is limited to sending only simple text messages, and it’s slow, but it has two virtues: Users connect asynchronously, so the network traffic is harder to track, and any user can act as the server, which means that even if the government shuts down one number in the network, another one can quickly pop up to take its place.

You could also take inspiration from groups that are working to create an ad-hoc communications network into and out of Egypt using Ham Radio, since the signals are rarely tracked and extremely hard to shut down or block. Most of these efforts are still getting off the ground, but hackers are already cobbling together ways to make it a viable form of communication into and out of the country.

Always Be Prepared

In the land of no Internet connection, the man with dial-up is king. Here are a few gadgets that you could use to prepare for the day they cut the lines.

Given enough time and preparation, your ham radio networks could even be adapted into your own ad-hoc network using Packet Radio, a radio communications protocol that you can use to create simple long-distance wireless networks to transfer text and other messages between computers. Packet Radio is rather slow and not particularly popular (don’t try to stream any videos with this, now), but it’s exactly the kind of networking device that would fly under the radar.

In response to the crisis in Egypt, nerds everywhere have risen to call for new and exciting tools for use in the next government-mandated shutdown. Bre Pettis, founder of the hackerspace NYC Resistor and creator of the Makerbot 3D printer, has called for “Apps for the Appocalypse,” including a quick and easy way to set up chats on a local network so you can talk with your friends and neighbors in an emergency even without access to the Internet. If his comments are any indication, Appocalypse apps may be headed your way soon.

Tons of cool tech are also just waiting to be retrofitted for these purposes. David Dart’s Pirate Box is a one-step local network in a box originally conceived for file sharing and local P2P purposes, but it wouldn’t take much work to adapt the Pirate Box as a local networking tool able to communicate with other pirate boxes to form a compact, mobile set of local networks in the event of an Internet shutdown.

Whether you’re in Egypt or Eagle Rock, you rely on your Internet access to stay in touch with friends and family, get your news, and find information you need. (And read PCWorld, of course.) Hopefully with these apps, tools, and techniques, you won’t have to worry about anyone–even your government–keeping you from doing just that.

Patrick Miller hopes he isn’t first against the wall when the revolution comes. Find him on Twitter or Facebook–if you have a working Internet connection, anyway.

David Daw is an accidental expert in ad-hoc networks since his apartment gets no cell reception. Find him on Twitter or send him a ham radio signal.